The economy has a way of growing faster than most countries

China’s economy is expected to grow by an estimated 5.5 percent this year.

That’s faster than the 7.6 percent growth forecast by the IMF, which also said it expected the country to grow at least 4.5 times faster.

But the country is on a different path from most countries.

China’s growth rate has been slowing in recent years, especially as its economy continues to suffer from overcapacity and a widening chasm between the rich and the poor.

In 2016, the country’s GDP grew at just 3.6% a year.

By the end of this year, China will be on pace to surpass the GDP growth rate of the United States, according to the IMF.

According to the World Bank, China’s economic growth will slow from around 6.3 percent this quarter to 4.6%.

In the meantime, the world economy will slow even more.

While China’s GDP growth is expected at a record-low of 3.2% this year due to a slowdown in economic activity, the IMF says China’s potential growth rate is still above 5%.

This year, the growth of the world’s second-largest economy is set to surpass that of the U.S. and the world as a whole, the International Monetary Fund said in a report.

While the IMF has been predicting China’s long-term economic growth of 5.6%, it also has been forecasting a 5.8% GDP growth by 2035, the most recent year the bank tracks.

The IMF has long been bullish about China’s future growth, especially with regards to its industrial base, which is predicted to be the world leader in manufacturing, and the country will have more than 1.5 billion people by 2037, the report said.

But as China’s industrial base is also set to shrink, the potential for economic growth has been shrinking.

In the past, China has been able to sustain a strong manufacturing base thanks to cheap labor and low cost of living.

The economic situation is changing, however, as the country has lost a large number of workers.

China’s economic woes are likely to continue until it reaches a tipping point, when its manufacturing base starts to shrink and its labor pool shrinks.

That will eventually force the country back to growth levels of its past, and possibly a decade ago, according the IMF report.