Which economic leaders are making the most progress?

NEW YORK — A new Brookings Institution report has found that the global economic and political establishment is far from reaching a consensus on what constitutes progress in the fight against climate change.

The study, titled The Global Economy and the Climate Revolution, was released Monday, two days before the U.N. climate change conference in Paris.

The report, conducted by the Brookings Institution’s Center for Global Development, looked at a broad array of issues from the economic to the political to the social and found that there is much to be excited about.

Its findings suggest that the economic and social world are coming together to address climate change, and that it will take time for the world to reach a consensus.

“There is no doubt that this is an unprecedented challenge and a momentous one,” said Brookings Institution President Peter A. Diamond.

“There is much work to be done and much more to do before we can call a global climate summit.

But the time to start is now.”

“This is an issue of urgency for the global economy, and it is an opportunity to unite all of us to fight for the common good, to fight to prevent catastrophic climate change and to fight the rising cost of extreme weather,” Diamond added.

This report also underscores the importance of the political.

“In a world in which we must all agree to act, it is essential that we are willing to do so without fear of the backlash of our political leaders who might block or punish our progress, if we fail to do the right thing,” Diamond said.

“The sooner we act, the sooner we will be able to build the institutions that will be necessary to achieve a common good.

We will need the cooperation of the global public to do that.”

The report found that nearly half of the world’s countries are in a state of economic recession, which it called the greatest threat to the future of the planet.

This recession is not unique to the U